Sunday, June 02, 2013

Poem for Sunday and Homestead Farm

Tender Buttons [A Little Called Pauline]
By Gertrude Stein

A little called anything shows shudders.
Come and say what prints all day. A whole few watermelon. There is no pope.
No cut in pennies and little dressing and choose wide soles and little spats really little spices.
A little lace makes boils. This is not true.
Gracious of gracious and a stamp a blue green white bow a blue green lean, lean on the top.
If it is absurd then it is leadish and nearly set in where there is a tight head.
A peaceful life to arise her, noon and moon and moon. A letter a cold sleeve a blanket a shaving house and nearly the best and regular window.
Nearer in fairy sea, nearer and farther, show white has lime in sight, show a stitch of ten. Count, count more so that thicker and thicker is leaning.
I hope she has her cow. Bidding a wedding, widening received treading, little leading mention nothing.
Cough out cough out in the leather and really feather it is not for.
Please could, please could, jam it not plus more sit in when.


The first day of June was in the 90s, right on schedule...well, except that it was in the 90s the previous couple of days, too. Adam went to volunteer at the DC Folk Festival at Glen Echo, which the rest of us will be attending on Sunday; on Saturday, the rest of us went to Target (among other things, Daniel needed a new bathing suit and slippers, and I needed socks and The Next Three Days on DVD).

Then we went to Homestead Farm to pick strawberries. It was quite hot to be out in the sun, but not crowded, and we got to see the goats and chickens before walking out to the strawberry fields (since it was so hot, we ended up taking the tractor back to the store). We had to stop at the food store as well on the way home, and we had breakfast food for dinner (pancakes, meatless bacon and sausages, etc.).

Courtesy a neighbor, we watched a couple of episodes of Arrested Development, which I am still loving, then we watched Hysteria, the invention-of-the-vibrator movie, which is pretty hysterical (in the good way, not the ridiculous medical diagnosis way). I should admit that I know Howard Gensler, who wrote the story upom which the film is based -- a fellow Daily Pennyslvanian alum -- but it's a great script, great cast, great entertainment!

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